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Dear all,

it’s a celebration day: angler.wordpress.com has reached a 50,000 hits!

 

Print

 

It’s about time to say thanks to all of you out there!

Numbers are still increasing, and currently we have about 3,000 views per month on average.

 

We will continue to contribute as much as we can about SharePoint Server!

 

Cheers!

Martin

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Howdy,

The Problem.

For teamsites and collaborations, sometimes it can be useful to upload big file size documents – which is allowed only partially by SharePoint and IIS. They both have different default settings for the maximum upload file size of a single document or file. They are:

  • SharePoint Server 2010: 50 MB
  • IIS7: ~30 MB

So, when trying to upload a big document, this results in the following error:

image

85 MB is simply too much for the above mentioned settings. Now, the solution section will show you how to fix this.

The Solution.

The good news is: This can be custom tailored to your needs, by simply following 3 steps. Here comes the first step:

1. Increase the SharePoint Upload Limit via Central Administration

First, you must increase the SharePoint 2010 upload limit.

  • Central Administration
  • “Manage Web Applications”
  • Select desired web application row (don’t click on the title, just select)
  • “General Settings” in the ribbon
  • Under Maximum Upload Size, change the setting to the desired value (e.g. 200 MB in our example)
  • “OK”

 

image

Now, the web app is equipped for receiving large files, but IIS7 will still prohibit it, resulting in the same error message as above. So, let’s move on to step 2.

 

2. Increase the IIS7 request length

Use the following command on the machine you are running the IIS 7:

%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config -section:requestFiltering -requestLimits.maxAllowedContentLength:valueInBytes

In our case, we’ll simply put 200x1024x1024=209715200 bytes.

You will receive a confirmation message after applying the command. Please bear in mind that you will need to run the cmd.exe in administrator mode.

image

 

3. Increase the IIS7 connection timeout length (optional)

One more thing to keep in mind is the connection timeout settings: When you upload large files, depending on your connection speed it can happen that the connection times out. If you want, you can increase the connection timeout to a larger value. The standard is 120 seconds. This step is optional, but can become required if you have users with low speed internet connections.

image

  • Open IIS
  • Select the Web Application
  • Click on Advanced Settings
  • Expand Connection Limits
  • Set the new value for Connection Time-out (seconds)

 

This is it – all done!

You users will now be able to upload larger files:

image

As usual, test any commands, configuration and settings on a test environment before applying them in production. Applying request lengths bears also some security implications to keep in mind. Use any advices and configurations at your own risk and evaluate risks before applying them.

 

Have a nice day and best regards!

Martin

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Howdy again,

I encountered a problem during the installation of the prerequisites of SharePoint 2010 Enterprise. The installation of KB976462 failed, and so would eventually the whole prerequisites installer. The error message pointed me to the log file.

Here is an excerpt from the installation log:

2012-01-11 16:07:21 – Beginning download of Hotfix for Microsoft Windows (KB976462)
2012-01-11 16:07:21 –
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=166369
2012-01-11 16:07:23 – Size of download of "Hotfix for Microsoft Windows (KB976462)" in bytes is "4331740"
2012-01-11 16:07:23 – Download of "Hotfix for Microsoft Windows (KB976462)" completed successfully
2012-01-11 16:07:23 – Installing Hotfix for Microsoft Windows (KB976462)
2012-01-11 16:07:23 – "C:\Windows\system32\wusa.exe" "C:\Users\xxx~1\AppData\Local\Temp\KB926A2.tmp.msu" /quiet /norestart
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Install process returned (-2145124329)
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – [In HRESULT format] (-2145124329)
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Last return code (-2145124329)
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Error: The tool was unable to install Hotfix for Microsoft Windows (KB976462).
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Last return code (-2145124329)
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Options for further diagnostics: 1. Look up the return code value 2. Download the prerequisite manually and verify size downloaded by the prerequisite installer. 3. Install the prerequisite manually from the given location without any command line options.
2012-01-11 16:07:26 – Cannot retry

So, the solution is quite simple: You must download, extract and install the hotfix manually. The following 3 steps show how it works:

1. Download the KB976462 manually from here:

http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/KB976462/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseId=4317

image

Choose the “x64” version of the msu file. Save it to a local directory: I used here C:\Installation\KB976462.

2. Open a command prompt and expand the msu file (make sure you open cmd with administrator rights)

expand -f:* "C:\Installation\KB976462\Windows6.1-KB976462-v2-x64.msu" %TEMP%

3. install using:

pkgmgr /n:%TEMP%\Windows6.1-KB976462-v2-x64.xml

 

All done! Re-run the prerequisites installer – it should finish with success, as expected.

 

Hope this was of some help!

Thanks and best regards,

Martin

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Hi there,

a few days ago I received the definitive confirmation that I’m going to speak at the Collaboration Days in Lucerne, Switzerland. The conference’s motto is as follows:

creating hands-on value’

Hence, the goal is to communicate best practices and tutorials, sessions that can be used right away in the field. No marketing or ads, just real-life SharePoint 2010 usage scenarios. Microsoft is supporting the conference as platinum sponsor, among many other sponsors.

 

Contents and Speakers

Here are some numbers:

  • 2 days (November 29th and 30th)
  • ~20 speakers
  • 7 MVPs
  • 4 tracks (IT Pro, Developer, Management, Solutions)
  • 40+ sessions

My session has been placed in the “Management” track and is called “Einstieg in Business Intelligence mit SharePoint 2010”. It will deal with the configuration of PerformancePoint Services and the creation of BI content using Dashboard Designer.

It’s a great honor to speak alongside with gurus such as Thorsten Hans, Dux Raymond Sy, Christian Glessner Michael Greth, Samuel Zürcher (who organises the Collaboration Days) and many many more!

 

Where and when?

The conference takes place at the KKL Luzern (CH).

Check out the official information at www.collaborationdays.ch.

I’m really looking forward to meeting many of you at the conference. More or less at the same time, my book, titled “Einstieg in Business Intelligence mit SharePoint 2010” should be printed and available. For the ones who want to give a glance at the book’s summary, here it is:

 

Einstieg in Business Intelligence mit Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Überblick und Konfiguration der Business Intelligence-Features von SharePoint 2010

http://www.amazon.de/Einstieg-Business-Intelligence-Microsoft-SharePoint/dp/3866456832/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1315309414&sr=8-1

 

Hope to meet many of you there!

Best regards,

Martin

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Dear all,

 

I already got the happy notice on July, 1st while on the way to the holidays. I returned 2 days ago and finally could embrace the MVP Award Kit!

 

In fact, I’m the first SharePoint Server MVP from South Tyrol, and one among only few in Italy.

 

WP_000554

The MVP Award Kit box.

 

MVP_Certificate

The Certificate.

 

I also updated my MVP Profile, which you can find here:

 

https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/profile/angler

 

The kit contained:

  • Glass-made award
  • Certificate
  • Plastic card w/ MVP ID
  • MVP Pin
  • NDA agreement

Thanks, Microsoft, and big thanks also to Ale and Marjorie! I hope to be able to contribute many, many more times to the communities and wish you all a nice week start!

 

I also hope to meet some of you at the conference Collaboration Days in Luzern, on November 29th and 30th this year!

 

Best regards,

Martin

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Dear all,

 

one of the definitely nicest features of the Service Pack 1 for SharePoint Server 2010 is the ability to restore single sites, which wasn’t possible before.

 

Procedure for restoring a site pre-SP1:

  • Restore entire farm from backup.

 

Drawbacks: Time consuming, costly. Most of the times not performed at all.

 

Procedure for restoring a site post-SP1:

  • Ensure user is a site collection administrator
  • Go to Site Actions –> Site Actions
  • Click Site Collection Administration
  • Click Recylce Bin
  • Check the site you want to restore and click Restore.

 

Quick and simple, isn’t it?

 

In Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 w/ SP1, a deleted site is not permanently deleted, but moved to the 2nd stage Recycle Bin. The default setting for automatic deletion is 30 days – however, this is modifyable. You can see how to do these changes here:

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc263125.aspx

 

Restoring whole Site Collections:

 

You can use the following PowerShell cmdlets to restore, delete or view deleted site collections:

 

Get-SPDeletedSite
Remove-SPDeletedSite
Restore-SPDeletedSite

 

Stay tuned till the next time and best regards,

Martin

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Dear all,

while you can plan and organize availability on farm level by configuring Network Load Balancing and also SQL Server database mirroring and failover clustering, you do also have the possibility to plan for high availability on service application level, especially for critical service applications like PerformancePoint. In order to perform this, you must have a failover database server along your normal SQL server.

 

Higher availability for PerformancePoint Services can be achieved by adding additional failover databases to the PerformancePoint Service Application.

 

Go to the Central Administration, choose the row of the PerformancePoint Services Application (don’t click the name, otherwise you’ll “Manage”), and select “Properties” from the ribbon. Just like in Fig. 1

 

image

Fig.1: Open the properties window for the PerformancePoint Service Application

 

Next, in the “Failover Database Server”, insert the name of your failover database server.

image

Fig. 2: Specify the database failover server

After you did this, click “OK” to confirm.

 

Before fully relying on this mechanism, it could make sense to do a test run to verify whether the failover is working at all.

 

Caution: Do not execute the following steps in a production environment, unless you know what you are doing. At all costs, before testing the settings, notify users, schedule downtimes and make sure to do this together with a SQL administrator. Before applying any changes in production, test them in a similar test environment. The following steps assume that you have a working failover cluster for SQL server. If you don’t, DO NOT PROCEED at this point. If you are having only a single instance of SQL server (tested or untested) or a failover cluster that has been untested or is known not to be working, DO NOT EXECUTE the following steps. Otherwise you might lose data and functionality of your SharePoint environment.

 

1. Open a PPS dashboard.

2. Then, shut the principal SQL server instance down (again: Caution! do not do this in a production environment or without experience. You might lose all or partial functionality of SharePoint temporarily). This is the machine that is running Configuration Manager.

3. The failover server should now take over all the workload of the principal server.

4. Refresh the dashboard. It should work fine.

5. Try to modify it to see whether also write operations work on the PPS failover database.

6. Make sure to start again the SQL Server instance and verify that everything is up and working again.

 

The PowerShell approach:

The same result can also be achieved using the following PowerShell cmdlet:

 

Set-SPPerformancePointServiceApplication –Identity <Identity> –DatabaseFailoverServer <Servername>

 

This is very straightforward and increases the availabilty of your PerformancePoint Services.

Upshot: If you have a running SQL Server failover cluster, with little effort you can achieve high availability also for you Business Intelligence data. Not bad, is it?

 

Stay tuned, and till next time!

Martin (still in Calabria)

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