Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Let’s rename the Internet of Things! #letsrenametheIOT

Why? Because it’s an old-fashioned buzzword!

Read more here: The “Internet of Things” sounds just stupid.

More on my new blog JACKED IN.

JACKED IN

Since the beginning of the year, I am pursuing a masters degree in international journalism at a Scottish university.

As such, I have had the great pleasure to talk with a former FT.com editor about my blog here at Scilogs.com, and she gave me great advice. Moreover, one of our first assignments is to come up with a multimedia blog.

These are some key takeaways of my current blogs’ analysis:

  • Use lots of images
  • Use lots of links
  • Use a blog roll
  • Write preferrably short pieces
  • Use a compelling layouts and graphics
  • Create unique content

Short and sweet: Today, I launch a new blog (which is kind of a spin-off of this one). Of course, I will continue contributing to Scilogs/Algoworld and writing about algorithms and prediction models.

The new blog is called JACKED IN, and it is less scientific but more about how technology secretly runs our lives.

Some of the topics will be:

  • The Internet of Things
  • Cyborgs
  • Sci-fi movie reviews
  • Tech projects that influence our future lives

You can read more about it here: Welcome to JACKED IN!

The first post is about a case for renaming the “Internet of Things”.

Are you jacked in?

Martin

Algoworld!

Dear readers,

I have decided to discontinue this blog and not further publish posts on SharePoint. Thank you for more than 160,000 visits!

I am now writing a blog on algorithms and science, which is hosted at http://www.scilogs.com The blog is called Algoworld:

Algoworld is all about algorithms, mathematical and computer models and how they influence and shape our daily lives. They are either inspired by science, or they are aiding it.
The models and algorithms you will find here deal with the prediction of hurricanes, earthquakes, health and crime (and many more to come!), but also with solving engineering problems like traffic jam optimization. Many of these algorithms are strongly interwoven with the analysis of scientific “big data” – hence they are also facing its implied problems.

You can find it here: Algoworld – algorithms meet science.

I hope to see you there!

Best wishes,
Martin W. Angler

Dear all,

this is a quick one.

 

The Problem.

Recently I had the problem of not being able to create a page based on a custom master page and page layout. The error shown was:

image

“List does not exist”

“The page you selected contains a list that does not exist”

When clicking on “Site Actions”-> “Create Page”, it simply wouldn’t show the insertion mask for title and URL, but issue the above shown error. The solution for this is easy and quick.

The Solution.

It is quite easy to solve this problem. The authenticated users just don’t have the permissions to read the master page gallery – or in other words: No masterpage access, no new page (which makes sense). Hence, you can go to:

Site Actions –> Site Settings –> Master pages and page layouts –> Settings –> Document library settings –> Permissions

and add there the group NT AUTHORITY\authenticated users (Read, Restricted Read), just like in the screenshot given below:

image

Return to the site or page where you initially wanted to create a page, and you will see it is going to create the page without problems.

 

I hope this was of some help!

Have a good time and stay tuned to the next blog post!

Best regards,

Martin

Jubilee: 50,000 hits!

Dear all,

it’s a celebration day: angler.wordpress.com has reached a 50,000 hits!

 

Print

 

It’s about time to say thanks to all of you out there!

Numbers are still increasing, and currently we have about 3,000 views per month on average.

 

We will continue to contribute as much as we can about SharePoint Server!

 

Cheers!

Martin

Howdy,

The Problem.

For teamsites and collaborations, sometimes it can be useful to upload big file size documents – which is allowed only partially by SharePoint and IIS. They both have different default settings for the maximum upload file size of a single document or file. They are:

  • SharePoint Server 2010: 50 MB
  • IIS7: ~30 MB

So, when trying to upload a big document, this results in the following error:

image

85 MB is simply too much for the above mentioned settings. Now, the solution section will show you how to fix this.

The Solution.

The good news is: This can be custom tailored to your needs, by simply following 3 steps. Here comes the first step:

1. Increase the SharePoint Upload Limit via Central Administration

First, you must increase the SharePoint 2010 upload limit.

  • Central Administration
  • “Manage Web Applications”
  • Select desired web application row (don’t click on the title, just select)
  • “General Settings” in the ribbon
  • Under Maximum Upload Size, change the setting to the desired value (e.g. 200 MB in our example)
  • “OK”

 

image

Now, the web app is equipped for receiving large files, but IIS7 will still prohibit it, resulting in the same error message as above. So, let’s move on to step 2.

 

2. Increase the IIS7 request length

Use the following command on the machine you are running the IIS 7:

%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config -section:requestFiltering -requestLimits.maxAllowedContentLength:valueInBytes

In our case, we’ll simply put 200x1024x1024=209715200 bytes.

You will receive a confirmation message after applying the command. Please bear in mind that you will need to run the cmd.exe in administrator mode.

image

 

3. Increase the IIS7 connection timeout length (optional)

One more thing to keep in mind is the connection timeout settings: When you upload large files, depending on your connection speed it can happen that the connection times out. If you want, you can increase the connection timeout to a larger value. The standard is 120 seconds. This step is optional, but can become required if you have users with low speed internet connections.

image

  • Open IIS
  • Select the Web Application
  • Click on Advanced Settings
  • Expand Connection Limits
  • Set the new value for Connection Time-out (seconds)

 

This is it – all done!

You users will now be able to upload larger files:

image

As usual, test any commands, configuration and settings on a test environment before applying them in production. Applying request lengths bears also some security implications to keep in mind. Use any advices and configurations at your own risk and evaluate risks before applying them.

 

Have a nice day and best regards!

Martin

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 26 other followers